Inland Waterways Safety Assessments
Australia has many beautiful inland waterways including rivers, creeks, streams, lakes, dams, lagoons and channels; however, they can pose safety risks, and these can vary depending on the type of waterway. Royal Life Saving research reveals that 1,145 people have died from drowning in Australian rivers, creeks and streams in the fifteen years between 1 July 2004 and 30 June 2019. A further estimated 550 people were hospitalised for a non-fatal drowning incident, many with a permanent disability.

River Drownings

Australia has many beautiful inland waterways including rivers, creeks, streams, lakes, dams, lagoons and channels; however, they can pose safety risks, and these can vary depending on the type of waterway.

Royal Life Saving research reveals that 1,145 people have died from drowning in Australian rivers, creeks and streams in the fifteen years between 1 July 2004 and 30 June 2019. A further estimated 550 people were hospitalised for a non-fatal drowning incident, many with a permanent disability.

The flat, still surface of an inland waterway can give a false sense of security. Currents, undertows or submerged objects – even in seemingly tranquil waterways – can prove to be very dangerous.

Royal Life Saving’s Inland Waterway Assessment is perfect for land managers who are responsible for waterways that have public access or where swimming and/or recreation occur.

The assessment is based on best practice both here and internationally and has become known as best practice in managing the risks associated with public access to inland waterways.

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